Frontiers
Mycobacterium tuberculosis Primary Infection and Dissemination: A Critical Role for Alveolar Epithelial Cells
Globally, tuberculosis (TB) has reemerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, despite the use of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine and intensive attempts to improve upon BCG or develop new vaccines. Two lacunae in our understanding of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb)-host pathogenesis have mitigated the vaccine efforts; the bacterial-host interaction that enables successful establishment of primary infection and the correlates of protection against TB. The vast majority of vaccine efforts are based on the premise that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is the predominating mode of protection against TB. However, studies in animal models and in humans demonstrate that post-infection, a period of several weeks precedes the initiation of CMI during which the few inhaled bacteria replicate dramatically and disseminate systemically. The “Trojan Horse” mechanism, wherein M. tb is phagocytosed and transported across the alveolar barrier by infected alveolar macrophages has been long postulated as the sole, primary M. tb:host interaction. In the current review, we present evidence from our studies of transcriptional profiles of M. tb in sputum as it emerges from infectious patients where the bacteria are in a quiescent state, to its adaptations in alveolar epithelial cells where the bacteria transform to a highly replicative and invasive phenotype, to its maintenance of the invasive phenotype in whole blood to the downregulation of invasiveness upon infection of epithel...
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fcimb.2019.00299/full